7 Dishes You are Mispronouncing

Sure, we all know how to pronounce “chipotle” now. But if you are a foodie, then there are lots of other items you eat regularly. It’s always good to know the correct pronunciation as you dine with friends and during networking.

  1. A common appetizer at Italian restaurants is bruschetta, a tomato mixture almost like a salad or salsa that sits atop toasted or grilled bread. Most of us in the U.S. take the letters “sch” and pronounce them “shh,” but the correct Italian pronunciation is “brew-skeht-uh.”
  2. Charcuterie: Popular at many restaurants, it is a selection of cured meats. These can be salami, chorizo, ham, and other meats. These high-quality meats are cured for long periods of time and have a salty, nutty flavor. They are often served with a selection of cheese too. It is pronounced “shar-koo-tury.”
  3. Even if you’ve never heard the word crudités, you’ve had it. It is basically fresh vegetables, like carrots, cucumbers, broccoli, and others, that are colorful and look good on a platter for parties. They are usually served with a dip, like ranch. The French word is pronounced “cru-dih-tay.”
  4. Foie gras: This controversial food is a rich, decadent, and expensive dish that is served in fine-dining restaurants, often as a starter. The dish has a special kind of buttery taste that is from the liver of a duck or goose. It is often served with bread and jam. It is pronounced “fwah-grah.”
  5. Haricots verts: These are like the French version of green beans. They are often fancied up and served with items such as almonds or bacon. As often with French words, you can pronounce it by dropping the last letter of the word: “ah-ree-koh-vehr.”
  6. Jícama: This Mexican root vegetable, similar to a turnip, is not only full of flavor but also quite healthy too. Full of fiber, it is great for weight loss, with only 35 calories for 100 grams. It is also full of nutrients and helps to regulate blood pressure. It is pronounced “he-caw-ma.”
  7. Sommelier: Like wine? If you are really good at detecting tastes and deciphering smells, then you could have a career as a sommelier. Sommeliers work in restaurants and make recommendations for wine to pair with meals. They also travel and lecture about wine at food conferences. Pronounce it “saw-mall-yay.”